Dangerous Assumptions

25 06 2008

There are two broad categories of error Christians need to understand. The first is doctrinal and involves what one believes. The second is practical and involves what one does.

Jesus said, “Why call ye me, Lord, Lord, and do not the things which I say?” (Luke 6:46). The doctrinal portion of this verse involves the Lordship of Christ and is correct. Jesus is Lord. The Greek word translated “Lord” is kurios and means master, owner, ruler, one who has control. So, to call Jesus “Lord” and yet not “do” what He says is an error in practice not doctrine.

Errors in practice are a serious problem for the local church. We are often not as godly as we ought to be or as forgiving or as committed. Yes, we Christians repeatedly fall short of the great doctrines we affirm, but that in no way invalidates them. On the contrary, it even confirms many of them, like the doctrine of the sinfulness of man. 

The opposite error is much harder to see. In fact, many never see it. It is the error of looking right but being wrong. It is possible to do things that look outwardly consistent with Christian teaching but not be scriptural at all. People see a church that matches their idea of what a church should look like or feel like and then assume it is a scripturally sound church. Big mistake.

What I’m saying is this:

It is a mistake to assume that a zealous and passionate church is a scripturally sound church (Romans 10:2).

It is a mistake to assume that a growing church is a scripturally sound church (Matthew 23:15).

It is a mistake to assume that a church with exciting worship services is a scripturally sound church (Exodus 32:6-7).

It is even a mistake to assume that a church which does many wonderful things in “Jesus name” is a scripturally sound church (Matthew 7:22-23).

Be careful not to judge a church by mere outward appearance. It may “feel” right and “look” right but be dead wrong.

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